It is my interpretation that this virus has gone through no less than 33 recombination events, with markers indicative of laboratory splicing, leaving 'sticky ends' that provide for recombination with foreign RNA. Note the 33 on this Bio-Weapon

Greetings Mr. Quayle,
With regards to Ebola:

I have a BS in molecular genetics, chemistry and psychology. During my undergraduate studies I spent three years conducting homologous recombination experiments on the BRCA2 gene (in breast cancer) at the Cancer Research Facility at the University of (REDACTED). During this time I conducted thousands of experiments where I spliced small tracts of DNA into plasmids for DNA amplification, sequencing and analysis.

In order to splice DNA, a very specific enzyme is used for each experiment. For instance, if I have a marker of

5' ...GAATTC... 3'
3' ...CTTAAG... 5'

at the end of my gene I would use EcoRI to splice at this particular spot in the DNA tract, leaving a 'sticky end' to be reattached to the 'sticky end' of my test sequence. These specific DNA sequences do not occur wide spread in nature because in some cases they are laboratory designed or researchers use an Ecoli enzyme to splice foreign DNA. This is true for RNA sequences, as well.

After analyzing the Ebola RNA sequence, it is apparent that this RNA sequenced gene has a high level of recombination sequences that have been PLACED between several gene sequences.

It is my interpretation that this virus has gone through no less than 33 recombination events, with markers indicative of laboratory splicing, leaving 'sticky ends' that provide for recombination with foreign RNA.

Oct 4, 2014

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